Seattle Wiki
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[[Highway 99]] is the North-South highway also known as Aurora Avenue within the Seattle city limits. The highway used to be an interstate road (U.S. Route 99) which spanned from Canada all the way down to Mexico.
 
[[Highway 99]] is the North-South highway also known as Aurora Avenue within the Seattle city limits. The highway used to be an interstate road (U.S. Route 99) which spanned from Canada all the way down to Mexico.
   
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In 1914, the North Trunk Road was established between [[Everett]] and Seattle as a small red brick road. In Seattle, the North Trunk Road comprised of Woodland Park Avenue, [[85th Street]], [[Greenwood Avenue]], [[Phinney Avenue]], [[Freemont Avenue]], the [[Freemont Bridge]] and [[Westlake Avenue]]. The original Aurora Avenue ran alongside the North Trunk Road and is now called [[Linden Avenue]]. Ronald Place in [[Shoreline]] near 175th Street and next to the Present Day Aurora Avenue is the last remaining part of the North Trunk Road's original brick roadbed. Most of this segment is impassable to car traffic.
Aurora Avenue was built in 1933 to carry U.S. Route 99 through Seattle and present day [[Shoreline]]. Aurora orignally connected to [[Wall Street]], directing U.S. Route 99 to [[Fourth Avenue]]. It was later connected to the [[Alaskan Way Viaduct]]/[[Battery Street Tunnel]]. Old historic motels that were once part of U.S. Route 99 are still visible today on Aurora Avenue, which became State Route 99 after the U.S. Highway was decommissioned in Washington.
 
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At the time it was established in 1926, U.S. Route 99 ran south along present day [[Lake City Way]] (State Route 522), Roosevelt Way and Eastlake Avenue before reaching downtown Seattle. After traffic began increasing down U.S. Route 99, new plans were proposed to merge U.S. Route 99 and the North Trunk Road together and rebuild the North Trunk Road as a Speedway.
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The North Trunk Road was re-constructed as the new Aurora Avenue from 1930 to 1933 so it could carry U.S. Route 99 through Seattle and present day [[Shoreline]]. Aurora orignally connected to [[Wall Street]], directing U.S. Route 99 to [[Fourth Avenue]]. It was later connected to the [[Alaskan Way Viaduct]]/[[Battery Street Tunnel]]. Old historic motels that were once part of U.S. Route 99 are still visible today on Aurora Avenue, which became State Route 99 after the U.S. Highway was decommissioned in Washington.

Revision as of 00:09, 15 April 2013

Highway 99 is the North-South highway also known as Aurora Avenue within the Seattle city limits. The highway used to be an interstate road (U.S. Route 99) which spanned from Canada all the way down to Mexico.

In 1914, the North Trunk Road was established between Everett and Seattle as a small red brick road. In Seattle, the North Trunk Road comprised of Woodland Park Avenue, 85th Street, Greenwood Avenue, Phinney Avenue, Freemont Avenue, the Freemont Bridge and Westlake Avenue. The original Aurora Avenue ran alongside the North Trunk Road and is now called Linden Avenue. Ronald Place in Shoreline near 175th Street and next to the Present Day Aurora Avenue is the last remaining part of the North Trunk Road's original brick roadbed. Most of this segment is impassable to car traffic.

At the time it was established in 1926, U.S. Route 99 ran south along present day Lake City Way (State Route 522), Roosevelt Way and Eastlake Avenue before reaching downtown Seattle. After traffic began increasing down U.S. Route 99, new plans were proposed to merge U.S. Route 99 and the North Trunk Road together and rebuild the North Trunk Road as a Speedway.

The North Trunk Road was re-constructed as the new Aurora Avenue from 1930 to 1933 so it could carry U.S. Route 99 through Seattle and present day Shoreline. Aurora orignally connected to Wall Street, directing U.S. Route 99 to Fourth Avenue. It was later connected to the Alaskan Way Viaduct/Battery Street Tunnel. Old historic motels that were once part of U.S. Route 99 are still visible today on Aurora Avenue, which became State Route 99 after the U.S. Highway was decommissioned in Washington.