Seattle Wiki
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Highway 99 is the North-South highway also know as Aurora within the Seattle city limits. The highway used to be an interstate road which spanned from Canada all the way down to Mexico.
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[[Highway 99]] is the North-South highway also known as Aurora Avenue within the Seattle city limits. The highway used to be an interstate road (U.S. Route 99) which spanned from Canada all the way down to Mexico.
   
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Aurora Avenue was built in 1933 to carry U.S. Route 99 through Seattle and present day [[Shoreline]]. Aurora orignally connected to [[Wall Street]], directing U.S. Route 99 to [[Fourth Avenue]]. It was later connected to the [[Alaskan Way Viaduct]]/[[Battery Street Tunnel]]. Old historic motels that were once part of U.S. Route 99 are still visible today on Aurora Avenue, which became State Route 99 after the U.S. Highway was decommissioned in Washington.
The [[Alaskan Way Viaduct]] is also part of Aurora.
 

Revision as of 03:45, 27 August 2012

Highway 99 is the North-South highway also known as Aurora Avenue within the Seattle city limits. The highway used to be an interstate road (U.S. Route 99) which spanned from Canada all the way down to Mexico.

Aurora Avenue was built in 1933 to carry U.S. Route 99 through Seattle and present day Shoreline. Aurora orignally connected to Wall Street, directing U.S. Route 99 to Fourth Avenue. It was later connected to the Alaskan Way Viaduct/Battery Street Tunnel. Old historic motels that were once part of U.S. Route 99 are still visible today on Aurora Avenue, which became State Route 99 after the U.S. Highway was decommissioned in Washington.